Fifth Third Bancorp v. Dudenhoeffer

In ERISA stock-drop class actions, plaintiffs routinely allege that their employers breached a duty of prudence by permitting employees to invest their retirement assets in their company’s stock.  Until today, defendants typically defended against such claims by invoking a judicially crafted presumption that offering company stock was prudent.  Today, in Fifth Third Bancorp v. Dudenhoeffer

In what circumstances should you be permitted to invest your retirement savings in your own employer’s stock? We have blogged before about an ERISA class action pending at the Supreme Court regarding when plan fiduciaries must prevent participants from investing in employer stock. After the Solicitor General filed an amicus brief (pdf) asking the Court

This past March, the Supreme Court asked the Solicitor General to weigh in as to whether two rather technical questions about ERISA stock-drop actions are worthy of the Court’s attention. See Fifth Third Bancorp v. Dudenhoeffer, No. 12-751. The Solicitor General filed his brief (pdf) yesterday. Sidestepping the technical questions, he asked the Court