As readers of this blog are well aware, manufacturers and retailers have faced a tidal wave of consumer class actions alleging false advertising in recent years. In these cases, the plaintiffs bemoan how they were deceived by the labels or advertising of all kinds of products – from yogurt to waffles to dog food to shampoo. But no matter how implausible these claims may be, judges often allow them to survive motions to dismiss (often multiple times), which inevitably ratchets up the pressure to settle. For companies that stick it out and take discovery of the named plaintiff, however, there
Continue Reading Food Court Grants Summary Judgment In Class Action Targeting “No Sugar Added” Label

The Ninth Circuit recently clarified the circumstances in which a plaintiff who settles his or her individual claims can appeal the denial of class certification of related claims. In Campion v. Old Republic Protection Company (pdf), the Ninth Circuit dismissed a class certification appeal as moot because the plaintiff had settled his individual claims. The court explained that a settling plaintiff must retain a personal, “financial” stake in litigation in order to appeal the denial of class certification—“the theoretical interest akin to a private attorney general” will not suffice.

The leading Ninth Circuit case on post-settlement class-certification appeals is Narouz
Continue Reading Plaintiffs Who Settle Individual Claims Can’t Appeal Class Claims in the Ninth Circuit Unless They Retain a “Financial Interest” in the Case

A plaintiff hopes to represent a class to pursue two sets of wage-and-hour claims but runs into headwinds in the district court.  First, one set of claims disappears because his legal theory doesn’t withstand a motion to dismiss.  Then class certification is denied on what was left.  After that, the defendant— invoking Rule 68 of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure—offers to settle “any liability claimed in this action.”  Under Rule 68, if the case goes to judgment and the plaintiff wins less than the offer, he would be liable for the defendant’s costs for any proceedings after the offer
Continue Reading Yes, you really did settle all your claims when you said you did: Ninth Circuit dismisses appeal of class certification denial by plaintiff who accepted Rule 68 offer

One of the hottest areas in class actions is litigation under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA).  And one of the most significant issues in TCPA litigation is the existence and scope of vicarious liability.  The key question is to what extent are businesses liable for the actions of third-party marketers who, without the consent of the recipient, send text messages or place calls using autodialers or prerecorded voices or transmit faxes?

Some plaintiffs had argued that businesses are strictly liable for TCPA violations committed in their name by third-party marketers.  Last year, the FCC rejected that approach in a
Continue Reading Eleventh Circuit adopts broad view of businesses’ potential liability under TCPA for faxes sent by third parties

The plaintiffs’ bar continues to file consumer class actions challenging food and beverage labels en masse, especially in the Northern District of California—also known as the “Food Court.” One particular line of cases—at least 52 class actions, at last count—targets companies selling products containing evaporated cane juice. The battle over evaporated cane juice has become the latest front in the war over whether federal courts should apply the primary-jurisdiction doctrine and dismiss or stay food class actions while awaiting guidance from the federal Food and Drug Administration.

In these cases, plaintiffs allege that the term “evaporated cane
Continue Reading Primary Jurisdiction is Gaining Some Weight in the Food Court

Until recently, many large companies have resigned themselves to the assertion of personal jurisdiction by courts in any state in which they do business—so long as the plaintiff has named the right corporate entity as defendant. That’s because the conventional wisdom has been that large companies are subject to personal jurisdiction nationwide because they do a lot of business in every state.

The Supreme Court recently has provided reason to revisit that assumption, however. Two recent decisions by the Court place significantly tighter limitations on the assertion of personal jurisdiction, equipping businesses with new defenses against forum-shopping by plaintiffs’ class-action lawyers.Continue Reading Are You Objecting to Personal Jurisdiction In Magnet Jurisdictions Yet?

In what circumstances should you be permitted to invest your retirement savings in your own employer’s stock? We have blogged before about an ERISA class action pending at the Supreme Court regarding when plan fiduciaries must prevent participants from investing in employer stock. After the Solicitor General filed an amicus brief (pdf) asking the Court to broaden its inquiry, the case was poised to challenge a bedrock of ERISA stock-drop actions—a presumption that fiduciaries act prudently when investing in employer stock.

On Friday, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in the case, Fifth Third Bancorp v. Dudenhoeffer, No. 12-751, but
Continue Reading Supreme Court Picks Up ERISA Stock-Drop Case: What’s Next?

In practice, the most significant change in modern litigation has been the dramatic increase in electronic discovery costs. As the amount of electronically stored information has skyrocketed over the past two decades, the burden on parties (chiefly businesses) to retain, review, and produce that information in litigation has exponentially increased as well.

Recognizing that reality, the federal Judicial Conference’s Advisory Committee on Civil Rules has recently issued a preliminary draft of proposed amendments to the Federal Rules (pdf) that, if adopted, would take some modest steps towards ensuring greater balance in the discovery process.

A number of interested parties will
Continue Reading Senate Judiciary Subcommittee Holds Hearing On Proposed Changes To Federal Rules Governing Discovery


Most people are familiar with Fig Newtons, an iconic cookie that has been around for over a century (at least according to its Wikipedia entry).  There are many other popular versions of Newtons—albeit of more recent vintage—such as raspberry and strawberry Newtons.  These fruit Newtons drew the ire of plaintiff Monique Manchouck, who filed a false advertising class action in the Northern District of California—which has become known as the nation’s “Food Court” —against the makers of the cookies.

What was her beef?  According to her complaint, the product packaging states that Newtons are “made with real fruit.”  
Continue Reading “Food Court” Rejects Class Action Alleging That Fruit Newtons Labels Are Misleading

We’ve previously written about the petition for interlocutory appeal in Chen v. Allstate Insurance Co., a TCPA class action that involves an important issue for class action practitioners:  can a named plaintiff refuse an offer of judgment for full relief and continue pursuing a class action?  The Ninth Circuit recently granted (pdf) the petition and can be expected to issue a briefing schedule soon.  We’ll continue monitoring this important case and report any developments
Continue Reading Update: Ninth Circuit to Decide Whether an Offer of Judgment to a Named Plaintiff Will Moot a Class Action