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Category Archives: Securities

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Class-Action Plaintiffs Must Offer Evidence Showing That They Meet Class-Certification Requirements

Posted in Adequacy, Class Certification, Predominance, Securities

A recent decision denying certification of a securities-fraud class action underscores that plaintiffs must prove with evidence that they satisfy the requirements of Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 23, not merely allege that they do so or promise that they can. The decision in In re Kosmos Energy Limited Securities Litigation arose from a class action… Continue Reading

Supreme Court Will Decide Whether Filing A Class Action Tolls Statute of Repose Under Federal Securities Laws

Posted in Securities, U.S. Supreme Court

Last year, we reported on the Second Circuit’s ruling in Police & Fire Retirement System of City of Detroit v. IndyMac MBS, Inc. (pdf), 721 F.3d 95 (2d Cir. 2013), that the filing of a class action does not toll the statute of repose in the Securities Act of 1933 for would-be class members who… Continue Reading

Reading the Halliburton Argument’s Tea Leaves

Posted in Securities, U.S. Supreme Court

Does today’s oral argument before the Supreme Court in the Halliburton case provide any clues regarding the Court’s likely decision?  (For background regarding the case, see yesterday’s post.) Not necessarily. “Court-watchers” are often quick to predict a case’s outcome based on the argument—and are very often wrong.  Remember the health care law that was certain… Continue Reading

Does Precedent or Congressional Action Prevent the Supreme Court from Reconsidering the Fraud-on-the Market Doctrine in Halliburton?

Posted in Securities, U.S. Supreme Court

The Supreme Court will grapple with private securities class actions when it hears oral argument tomorrow in Halliburton v. Erica P. John Fund, Inc. The principal question in the case is the continuing validity of the fraud-on-the-market doctrine, endorsed by the Court twenty-five years ago in Basic Inc. v. Levinson, which relieves plaintiffs asserting claims under… Continue Reading

Supreme Court Picks Up ERISA Stock-Drop Case: What’s Next?

Posted in Motions Practice, Securities, U.S. Supreme Court

In what circumstances should you be permitted to invest your retirement savings in your own employer’s stock? We have blogged before about an ERISA class action pending at the Supreme Court regarding when plan fiduciaries must prevent participants from investing in employer stock. After the Solicitor General filed an amicus brief (pdf) asking the Court… Continue Reading

Supreme Court Will Address “Fraud-On-The-Market” Presumption in Securities Class Actions

Posted in Securities, U.S. Supreme Court

Earlier today, the U.S. Supreme Court granted review in Halliburton Co. v . Erica P. John Fund, No. 13-317, to address an important question affecting securities class actions: whether the “fraud-on-the market” presumption created by the Court in Basic, Inc. v. Levinson remains viable in light of new developments—both in economic thinking and in the… Continue Reading

Class Action Filing Doesn’t Toll Statute of Repose for Securities Claims, Says Second Circuit

Posted in Motions Practice, Securities

Under the American Pipe rule, in federal court the filing of a class action tolls the statute of limitations for would-be class members. Otherwise, the Supreme Court reasoned in American Pipe, putative class members would have to intervene or file their own individual actions during the pendency of the class action in case class certification… Continue Reading

Can Securities Fraud Defendants Rebut Price Impact To Avoid Class Certification?

Posted in Class Certification, Commonality, Predominance, Securities

In Section 10(b) securities-fraud cases based on affirmative misrepresentations, a class action cannot be certified unless investor reliance is presumed under the fraud-on-the-market theory of Basic, Inc. v. Levinson, 485 U.S. 224 (1988). In Erica P. John Fund, Inc. v. Halliburton Co., 131 S. Ct. 2179 (2011), the Supreme Court ruled that a plaintiff does… Continue Reading

Supreme Court Denies Review In NECA-IBEW Case

Posted in Adequacy, Class Certification, Commonality, Predominance, Securities, Typicality

We’ve been blogging about the Second Circuit’s decision in NECA-IBEW Health & Welfare Fund v. Goldman Sachs (pdf), which held that a named plaintiff in a securities fraud suit might have standing in some situations to assert class action claims regarding securities that he or she never purchased. Yesterday, the Supreme Court denied (pdf) Goldman’s petition… Continue Reading

Securities Fraud Defendant Rebuts Fraud-on-the-Market Presumption of Reliance

Posted in Class Certification, Motions Practice, Predominance, Securities

With all of the attention on last week’s Amgen decision, another interesting decision addressing the fraud-on-the-market presumption of reliance in securities fraud actions may have escaped notice. In GAMCO Investors, Inc. v. Vivendi, S.A. (S.D.N.Y. Feb. 28, 2013), Judge Scheindlin found that the defendant had rebutted the presumption of reliance as to a group of related… Continue Reading

Supreme Court Holds that Securities Fraud Plaintiffs Need Not Show Materiality at Class Certification

Posted in Class Certification, Securities

Today, in Amgen Inc. v. Connecticut Retirement Plans and Trust Funds, No. 11-1085, the Supreme Court held that proof of materiality is not a prerequisite for class certification in a securities fraud class action under Section 10(b), even though materiality is a predicate of the fraud-on-the-market presumption of reliance.  The opinion for the majority of… Continue Reading

Plaintiffs Seek to Revive Securities Fraud Class Actions Under Second Circuit’s “Class Standing” Doctrine

Posted in Class Action Trends, Securities

I previously blogged about the Second Circuit’s troubling decision in NECA-IBEW Health & Welfare Fund v. Goldman Sachs & Co. (pdf), 693 F.3d 145 (2d Cir. 2012), which invented a “class standing” doctrine allowing a named plaintiff in a class action to assert Securities Act claims regarding securities that he or she never purchased. In the… Continue Reading

Cornerstone and Stanford Law School Issue Report On Securities Class Actions

Posted in Class Action Trends, Securities

According to a recent report authored by Cornerstone Research and the Stanford Law School Securities Class Action Clearinghouse, Securities Class Action Filings—2012 Year in Review (pdf), 19 percent fewer securities fraud class actions were filed in federal court in 2012 than in 2011. The 152 new class actions filed in 2012 is the second-lowest such number… Continue Reading

Are Quasi-Class Action Suits By State AGs Removable Under CAFA (Or, For Securities Fraud Cases, Barred By SLUSA)?

Posted in Antitrust, Class Action Trends, Securities

A number of courts recently have weighed in on a question we’ve blogged before—whether lawsuits by state attorneys general seeking restitution on behalf of private citizens are subject to removal under the Class Action Fairness Act of 2005 (pdf) (“CAFA”). These rulings have broad implications for the litigation of these quasi-class actions.  They also are of… Continue Reading

Supreme Court to Decide Scope of Preemption of State-Law Securities Class Actions by SLUSA

Posted in Securities, U.S. Supreme Court

On Friday, the Supreme Court granted review in three consolidated cases: Chadbourne & Parke LLP v. Troice, No. 12-79, Willis of Colorado v. Troice, No. 12-86, and Proskauer Rose LLP v. Troice, No. 12-88. The Court’s decision will clarify when the federal Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act (“SLUSA”) preempts state-law securities class actions. After Congress… Continue Reading

DRI Amicus Brief Argues That Second Circuit’s Expansive View Of “Class Standing” In Securities Cases Should Be Rejected

Posted in Securities, U.S. Supreme Court

A few months ago, I posted about a Second Circuit decision that threatens to open the floodgates to securities class actions, NECA-IBEW Health & Welfare Fund v. Goldman Sachs & Co., 693 F.3d 145 (2d Cir. 2012).  In that decision, the Second Circuit ruled that even though a plaintiff in an individual action may assert… Continue Reading

Supreme Court Hears Oral Argument On Whether Materiality Must Be Proven At The Class Certification Stage In Securities Class Actions

Posted in Class Certification, Securities, U.S. Supreme Court

The Supreme Court recently heard oral argument in a case that may have a significant impact on how district courts resolve class certification fights in securities fraud cases. The issue in Amgen Inc. v. Connecticut Retirement Plans and Trust Funds is whether a class can be certified if the alleged misrepresentations constituting the fraud are… Continue Reading